Stitching Pieces of the Past: Quilt Artist Kathleen McVeigh

What do you see when you look at a quilt? An old-fashioned bedspread? Something your mother or grandmother used to sew? Most of us only see what’s in front of us: cotton, batting and thread. We don’t look past what it is to envision what it could become. That’s what sets Kathleen McVeigh apart. She doesn’t see just a quilt. She sees a coat, a dress, a top, a bag — she sees endless possibility and potential. With care, thoughtfulness and great consideration, Kathleen transforms handmade vintage quilts into one-of-a-kind garments and accessories. With the help of her Ultrafeed® LS-1 Sewing Machine, she is bridging the past to the present and creating something truly unique.

quilted coat
One of Kathleen’s unique quilted coat designs.

Transformation. It’s the core of all DIY. To take something and turn it into something else. Breathing new life into heirloom quilts is Kathleen’s calling. With a background in fine art, she has used her creative talents and eye for design to transform these forgotten treasures into beautiful coats, dresses and bags for a new generation to fall in love with and cherish all over again.

Kathleen’s love of quilting runs deep. She grew up watching her grandmother quilt and, later, taught herself to quilt as an adult. “My grandmother taught me to sew when I was 4 or 5. I would go over to her house for visits or sleepovers and she would give me some of the triangle pieces she was quilting to sew together while we watched movies. I have really good memories of sewing with my grandmother and learning about the different fabrics we were using, mostly from old family clothes, linens, sheets or curtains.”

You can imagine that a great deal of consideration goes into cutting apart quilts and piecing them together, creating something completely new yet that retains the beauty and personality of the original quilt. Considering how much time goes into making a quilt — vintage quilts took anywhere from several months or even years to complete — you can tell that Kathleen has the utmost respect and appreciation for the original quilter, and she reflects that in the care and attention she puts into creating her coats and other quilted goods.

Kathleen started her business, Kitty Badhands, in 2016. At the time, she focused solely on handcrafting minimalist modern quilts and custom, made-to-order quilts. Due to time limitations, it was a part-time hobby. In 2020, she relocated her sewing studio to her apartment and space became a major issue. So, she decided to make a quilted coat because it was a project that she could work on in her dining room. What she intended as a personal side project turned into the future of her business and brand. “The response from friends also wanting a coat was overwhelming, and it grew from there into a full-time job fairly quickly.”

We sat down with Kathleen to learn more about her DIY inspiration, her history with sewing and quilting, and why she chose the Sailrite Ultrafeed to help her turn quilts into unique and wearable works of art.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Q. Do you consider yourself a creative person?

A. I do. I think almost everyone is creative in their own way, and my creativity manifests itself visually. I love dreaming up forms in my head and being able to create those forms with my hands. Whether that’s making a coat, a sketch, the way I decorate a room, or cook a meal, I think creativity is a huge part of what makes everyday life interesting and exciting.

Q. What do you love about the DIY and creative lifestyle?

A. The DIY/creative lifestyle, in my case, has been about creating and building the Kitty Badhands brand. There is so much to love about running my own business. I get to do what I love every day, on my terms, and I get to be my own boss. I worked in the service and restaurant industry for 12 years. Every day, when I would go to work, I would think: “This isn’t what I’m supposed to be doing. This isn’t a good use of my energy and it doesn’t make me happy.” Having a creative and DIY lifestyle for me means living on my own terms and being responsible for my own happiness and survival. It’s a dream.

A handful of Kathleen’s stunning creations!

Q. How did you get the idea to turn vintage quilts into one-of-a-kind coats?

A. I had a beloved wool coat that was passed down to me by a friend. The cut of it was very unique and it was beginning to fall apart. I tried to mend it, and when that didn’t work, I decided to cut the coat apart and try to use the pieces as a pattern to recreate the same coat from a new material. I think I naturally gravitated toward remaking the coat out of a quilt because I felt very comfortable working with quilts (I had already been quilting for several years), and the quilt I had in mind to use was a similar weight and thickness to the wool from the coat. This was just a personal side project for me, but friends were really interested in the coat I made and wanted one of their own. So I started making them for friends and, eventually, folks I had never met started asking for their own quilt coats.

Q. Can you describe the process of turning a quilt into a coat?

A. I first spend a lot of time looking at the quilt and thinking about how I will cut it up. I only ever cut into vintage quilts that are damaged in some way and in need of new life (stains, rips, holes, etc.). If I find an heirloom quilt in pristine condition, I leave it alone, as it would be wrong to cut into something like that. Once I have an idea of how I want the coat to look, I lay my coat pattern pieces over the quilt, making sure I have enough quilt to work with (sometimes I find out that I don’t and then I have to rethink the placement and design), and then trace them with a chalk marker. I cut all of the pieces and now I’m ready to sew.

First, I work on lining up and attaching pockets first. Next I sew up the sleeves. Lastly, I attach the front panels to the back panels. Then I serge all of the seams together before attaching the sleeves to the body of the coat. I use a mannequin to pin and adjust as I work. After serging the armholes, I work on either a collar or a hood and attach it to the neckline of the coat. The last part of the sewing process is all of the topstitching to keep seams folded and to give it a more professional finish. I use antique brass snaps for my coats, and I measure and mark where the snaps will go so that the coat will come together evenly when snapped. I either use a snap fastener or a hammer, depending on how thick the quilt I’m working with is. My final step is sewing in my tags; it feels like I’m “signing” the work and deciding that it’s finished.

From quilt to coat!

Q. How do you acquire the quilts and where do they come from?

A. They come from all over. When I started, I had a small collection of handmade quilts that I had collected from thrift stores and estate sales throughout the years, but those ran out very quickly. Right now, because of COVID, I am mostly finding my quilts on websites that do online auction and estate sales. I am excited that in-person estate sales and antique shops are beginning to open back up in my area. A nice surprise has been that as my business has grown, folks have begun to reach out to me with quilts that they want to sell, or local people will tip me off to a quilt that is for sale in one of the thrift/antique stores in town. Searching for and finding old quilts that speak to me is one of my favorite parts of the job.

Q. What made you decide on an Ultrafeed Sewing Machine?

A. What first caught my eye was the design and look of the machine itself: I think it’s quite beautiful and stylish. What made me decide to pull the trigger on purchasing one was that Sailrite seems to be a very involved company that cares about its customers. There were lots of glowing reviews, lots of troubleshooting videos on YouTube, and I heard that the manual was very easy to follow (super important for me). I’m a visual person, so I used the Sailrite videos almost exclusively instead of the guidebook to set up my machine, learn how to thread the machine, and how to wind the bobbin. They were super clear and helpful.

sewing with ultrafeed
Kathleen works on a quilted project with her Ultrafeed LS-1.

Q. How has the machine performed for you?

A. It’s been a business-saver. It has been able to sew through many thick layers of heavy quilts. I have a stack of thick quilts that have just been sitting on my shelves because my other sewing machine could not handle them. So far, the Ultrafeed hasn’t encountered a single quilt that it can’t sew through.

Q. Where does your design inspiration come from?

A. When I first started out, I didn’t really “design” the coat at all. I would just start cutting and the finished pattern was a surprise (sometimes good and sometimes not so good). It was by doing this and seeing the different results that I started to understand how the different pieces of the quilted coat would come together. Now, I can look at a quilt and the coat jumps out at me. I can visualize how different parts of the quilt would lend themselves to a sleeve or a pocket, or where the patterns will come together at the seams of the back and front. It’s very important to me that the pattern flows seamlessly throughout the coat to create one cohesive piece and that there is a balance of different colors and shapes throughout. The most exciting, and also excruciating, part of the design process is that I can often see many different ways a quilt could be cut to make a coat. Each option would create something that looks entirely different, but there is only one quilt and one opportunity to make the coat. Deciding which direction to go can be difficult.

Recently, Kathleen has expanded her quilted offerings to include dresses, tops, totes and clutches. With the weather getting warmer, she wasn’t sure customers would be interested in purchasing coats during the summer months. Adding warm-weather wearables was a natural next step in her new and growing online business. Her quilted totes incorporate a waxed canvas base and strap, adding a modern look and finish to her classic quilted style. Kathleen relies on her Ultrafeed to handle the thickness of the combined waxed canvas and quilt layers.

It takes a special person to appreciate the artistry and dedication that goes into cutting, piecing, sewing and binding a quilt. Kathleen gives these once-loved quilts the care and attention they deserve. They are in good hands with Kathleen. Someone’s beloved heirloom is no longer lost to history. She gives these family treasures a new life as they find their way into the hands of someone who will cherish them as much as their original creators.

If you’d like to see more of Kathleen’s quilted creations, you can follow her on Instagram at @kittybadhands.

Leather Crafting With the Fabricator®

This is a story of changing circumstances, making the best of a bad situation, and venturing out in a new direction. It’s a story of finding your own path while paying tribute to where you came from and honoring those who taught you life’s greatest lessons. It’s also a story that’s becoming increasingly well-known and relatable to many.

Caleb Arthur was laid off from his job at a sheet metal factory in early 2020 due to circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic. With time on his hands, he decided to revisit a dormant interest in leather crafting. Months after the layoff and with no call back to work, he decided to get serious about his leather crafting hobby and see if he could turn his leatherwork into a source of income.

As a beginner, he was hand stitching his leather goods. He quickly realized he needed something more efficient and productive if he was going to pursue leatherwork as a business. He needed a leather sewing machine. That’s when Caleb discovered Sailrite® and the Fabricator® Sewing Machine. With the quiet, energy-saving Workhorse® Servo Motor and the ability to sew one stitch at a time, the Fabricator delivered the precision and control Caleb was looking for. “I was attracted to the Fabricator’s wider throat for fitting larger projects through. I knew it was a heavy, solid machine and I had to have it.”

Caleb with Fabricator
Caleb with his Fabricator in his sewing studio. Photography by Marc Montes

With the addition of the Fabricator to his sewing studio, Caleb has been able to tackle bigger leather projects and dramatically speed up his productivity — a huge upgrade in more ways than one for a new business getting its feet off the ground. “What is so exciting to me now is the ability to take on projects that I never would have if I were solely hand stitching.” When he was hand stitching, small items like bifold wallets, skillet handle covers and passport holders could take hours to pattern and stitch. With the Fabricator, Caleb has added items like leather and waxed canvas tote bags to his product offerings. “I can now assemble the body of a tote in minutes as opposed to hours. The ability to dial in my stitch length and distance with the material guide keeps my stitches looking uniform.”

We sat down with Caleb to discuss his sewing roots, what DIY means to him, his leather crafting business and much more. Join us as we get to know this creative old soul and find out how the Fabricator has allowed him to greatly increase his productivity and stitch quality. When COVID-19 closed the door on his career, he found a window. And that window is even better than he could have imagined. Here’s Caleb’s story, in his own words.

Q. When and how did you learn to sew? Are you self-taught?

A. Since I was a baby, I have always been surrounded by sewing and the DIY lifestyle. I was co-raised by my grandparents, and my grandma always had her own separate sewing room where I spent a lot of my time. My grandma worked for a tiny little company called Eddie Bauer back when they still made their goods here in the United States. She was a seamstress for them and also repaired sailboat sails for a short period. The majority of my clothes were handmade by her as a kid. I never took an interest in sewing myself until recently. My grandpa had a workshop in the garage where I found more interest at the time. He built and fixed most things around the house, so I adapted that from him. I have always kind of lived by the motto of, “What would Grandpa do?”

Caleb with grandma sewing
Caleb keeps his grandmother company in her sewing room.

I would like to give a ton of credit and thanks to Ryan over at “Little King Goods.” I came across his videos and company via YouTube, and it is safe to say that I have learned so much about sewing and leather craft through his amazing videos. I don’t think I would have made the full plunge into leatherwork if it weren’t for his motivational and inspirational videos. He really made me feel like it was attainable for me. Super nice guy too. Thanks, Ryan! So, I’m self-taught but with great mentors.

Q. What type of leather goods do you make? 

A. Right now, I am focusing on making the best classic, functional leather goods I possibly can. Wallets are my most popular item, and I recently dove into the world of tote bags and guitar straps. I make field note covers and clutches for the ladies and gents. I’m really open to just challenging myself and trying a bit of everything. If I think it’s a good fit for my permanent catalog on my website, then I put it up. My theme or logo for my branding is that of the great outdoors, as I have a huge respect for nature. I feel so gifted and lucky to have spent most of my life in the state of Washington. While, yes, it is true about the constant rain, it just makes those clear sunny days even more special. We really know how to take advantage. Mount Rainier overlooks our amazing city of Tacoma and is a constant reminder of the power of Mother Nature. 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Q. How did you get started in leatherwork?

A. My first dive into leatherwork was around five or six years ago when I was working as a merchant mariner. My wife (girlfriend at the time) had bought me a really nice leatherworking kit that included everything I needed to make a few very basic leather items — wallet, keychain, coin pouch. In my downtime on the ship, I would head down to the workshop and tinker away at making those items. I found much enjoyment from dying the leather and learning the basics of stamping and tooling. It was a nice way to pass the time as we would sail back and forth from California to Alaska, but it was a hobby I would not revisit until 2020.

Q. What do you love about leather crafting?

A. For me, leatherwork has become a form of stress relief. I find so much pleasure in creating and turning nothing into something. The entire process of working with leather — from the texture, the smell (OH THAT SMELL!), to the way you can form it into anything imaginable. I’m a bit of an old soul and I love the fact that leatherwork has been around for ages and has stood the test of time. I love the way that people are drawn to a classic, well-crafted leather good. To me it carries a bit of respect and class, and I believe that we should treat it as such. I always hold onto even the tiniest of scraps as I always find another purpose for them in a future project.

making a tote
Caleb patterns, cuts and assembles a tote bag using DuraWax™ Waxed Canvas from Sailrite. Photography by Marc Montes

Q. Do you consider yourself a creative person? 

A. I have always felt that I had a creative side to me but more so a strong desire to create. I’ve always wanted to make things with my hands, to be able to show something/anything to the world that I was proud of. With leather crafting, I fill that desire to create and share with the world. Creating my Etsy page and personal website was a huge moment for me, allowing the entire world to have access to my craft. I have received great feedback and the support has been amazing thus far. I would like to thank my customers for their support as I grow and improve.

Q. What do you love or relate to about the DIY/handcrafting lifestyle?

DIY is pretty much my motto for most things. I learned from my seven years in the U.S. Navy that if you want something done right, it’s best to do it yourself. At home, my wife and I rarely hire outside work if we think it’s something we can take on, or at least learn ourselves. For one, it saves a ton of money; two, we get to learn and educate ourselves in the process; and, thirdly, there’s nothing like the sense of pride you get from taking on a project that you did yourself.  

Photography by Marc Montes

Q. What would you say is your design aesthetic with your leather goods?

A. I spent a lot of my childhood with my grandparents and I think it’s safe to say that I was taking mental notes of what my Grandpa Clyde had around and what he depended on, from his beat-up old Redwing work boots to his tool-stamped leather wallet to his belts. I try to make the best durable, made-to-last goods that I can that have a classic, old-fashioned look to them. Simple design, classic colors and built to last. I’m a big fan of natural earth tones.

Q. Is there a special meaning or significance to your business name, CAMP Leather Goods?

A. Yes! So my company, CAMP, has a few things going on — one being my obvious passion for camping and nature and wanting to make goods geared toward outdoor use. But it started off with me wanting to incorporate my initials, CA (Caleb Arthur), into the name. While I was driving around town one day, I was thinking of my Grandpa Clyde who passed away a couple years ago. He was really my greatest mentor and I observed him build and create my whole life; he was truly an exceptional man. My Grandpa never once called me by my birth name but instead chose “Mutty” for my name. He gave all of us grandkids a sort of nickname, so I became “Mutt,” or “Mutty” or “Old Man Mutt.” As I feel that I am still striving to make him proud, I created an acronym for CAMP that has a more personal meaning for me, and that is the “Clyde And Mutty Project.” It’s my way of keeping his spirit alive with every product I put out.

caleb sewing waxed canvas
Photography by Marc Montes

Q. Is there anything you’d like our readers to know about you, your business or your DIY philosophy?

A. While at the end of the day I am a crafter/leatherworker, I hope to inspire anyone who may feel like they are struggling to find their drive or passion. I have spent a lot of time waiting for the answers to land in my lap, and I can tell you that has been wasted time. If you want something, or you want to be something, study the craft, make those mistakes — make big ones! That is the only way we are going to learn and improve. Ask questions; ask for help! Adapt the notion that failure or giving up simply is not an option. Don’t be held back with the idea of, “What if this doesn’t succeed?” Instead, take on the action of, “What do I need to do now to make this succeed?” Define what success is and what it looks like to you.

One last thing: I would like to thank my beautiful wife, Katie, and the recent mother of our newborn, Lincoln. Without her support, I would be working a job that I couldn’t stand, always wanting something else. She motivates me and supports me in doing what makes me happy and I absolutely adore her for that. When the busy holiday rush of orders hit, she was right next to me cutting leather staying caught up. I really hit the jackpot with her!

Caleb and Katie
Caleb and Katie at their home in Tacoma, Washington. Photography by Marc Montes

Congratulations on turning your dream into a reality, Caleb! We’re so thrilled that Sailrite and the Fabricator could be part of your DIY journey. Keep on creating!

If you’d like to follow Caleb on Instagram and see what he’s making with his Fabricator, you can follow him at @campleathergoods.

DIY & EDC: A Match Made in Self-Reliance

What is EDC? It stands for “everyday carry” and it represents a lifestyle of utility and preparedness. EDC items consist of pouches, bags or backpacks containing everyday essentials. A person’s EDC kit is very personal, containing items they think are essential to their daily life. Typical EDC items include things like keys, wallet and phone, but also a small flashlight, pen and notebook, lighter, pocket knife or multitool — things that all serve a purpose and have a useful function. Having these essentials with you every day means that you’re ready for anything and prepared for the unexpected — should the need arise.

What do EDC and DIY have in common? More than you’d think. At its core, EDC embodies a belief in always being prepared but also being able to take control of a situation and handle it on your own. That kind of self-reliance and self-accountability is echoed in the heart of every DIYer. Having the right tools to handle any situation has a common thread in the DIY lifestyle.

Tim Galloway is a newcomer to both the DIY and EDC communities. He’s a professional photographer who has worked in news and done some commercial work for the past 10 years. But when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, it put an indefinite hold on his photography business. With time on his hands and a desire to stay busy and productive, he turned his attention to something that has always piqued his interest: sewing EDC items.

ultrafeed sewing
Tim sews an EDC bag using his Ultrafeed LSZ-1 Sewing Machine.

The EDC community is popular and growing, and Tim is carving out his own space with his small business, goodwerks. Right now, it’s a one-man operation. Tim cuts the patterns for his bags and EDC accessories and sews everything himself. At first, he was using a home sewing machine. But he quickly realized it wasn’t powerful enough to sew through the heavy-duty layers of his bags and straps. He discovered the Sailrite® website and ordered the Ultrafeed® LSZ-1 Sewing Machine. With the Ultrafeed, he’s been able to sew with professional results and deliver the quality that the EDC industry demands.

Join us as we get to know this small-business owner, his DIY philosophy, and how Sailrite could be part of his sewing journey.

Sewing & Sailrite

Tim had never sewn before he decided to give his EDC hobby a real shot at success. But he didn’t let that small hiccup stop him. “I learned to sew in May of 2020 mainly through YouTube tutorials and trial and error. My mom helped me search for a domestic machine that would be able to handle heavier materials as I sew primarily Cordura and webbing. I grew out of that machine very quickly as I realized that it wouldn’t be able to handle the layers as smoothly as I had hoped and certainly not the volume. Especially if I’m sewing daily or close to it.”

In need of a heavy-duty machine that could handle materials like Cordura, ripstop and webbing, Tim started his search. “I did a bunch of research. I looked at a lot of other machines, peeking at Juki, Consew, etc. Frankly, the price point was a bit out of reach for me for a Juki setup, and I really wanted a new machine. I watched a ton of videos and read a bunch of articles. The thing that drew me to the LSZ-1 was the walking foot, ease that it dealt with heavier materials (like, you know, sails), the optional Workhorse® Servo Motor (which I use with the full table setup) and the fabled legendary customer service.”

He received his Ultrafeed LSZ-1 in July of 2020 and has been sewing with it regularly. Even though Tim is a new sewer, he still had a lot to say about the machine. “The machine works really well for flat work. I think with the correct thread and needle setup, it is pretty smooth sailing (see what I did there?). I really enjoy having the servo motor so I can sew at night when my wife is sleeping. With this being the only industrial-type machine I’ve used, there are a lot of things I don’t know about how they operate. So there was a bit of a learning curve. I refer to the manual somewhat often and have had to learn to have a few extra parts on hand in the event of a maligned needle strike, etc.”

tim sewing

The EDC Community

Tim’s bags and pouches are simple in design and are made with high-quality fabrics and hardware pieces. He uses 1000D Cordura fabric with a ripstop liner for a professional look and to help with water resistance. Cordura is well-known in the hiking, camping and rucking communities for its incredible durability and water resistance. Tim’s most popular design is the Boogie Bag, which is a fanny pack with zippered compartments to keep everything organized. “I based it off of other, similar bags but addressed a few things I did or didn’t like on others. I want my products to ooze quality and durability. My company slogan, if you’d call it that, is ‘Simple. Durable. Handmade.’ I’m not really looking to reinvent the wheel but just bring quality into small soft goods.”

Tim’s current demographic is people in the rucking community. Rucking is a form of endurance training that involves marching at a fast pace carrying a weighted pack. Anyone can ruck as a form of exercise, but those who participate in GORUCK events are serious endurance athletes who expect a lot from their gear. And they have started turning to goodwerks for their rucking needs. “I’ve been very fortunate to have made fantastic friends in that community who have supported my small business and buy from me every time I drop goods. I mainly sell out of my stuff but am slowly building stock. Ideally, I want to transition more to the EDC community. I want my products to be accessible for all folks that are interested in quality gear for their everyday organization and needs.”

“I hold high the value of handmade goods and small businesses. From personal experience, I know how challenging it is to run your own business. How you have to wear a lot of different hats to make things come together. The late nights, early mornings, weekends you sacrifice, and so on. I think that when people can find something that they care about enough to devote to that, it deserves praise. When I make my products I know that they’re not going to be perfect every time, but I do the best I can to make them look like they were produced on a mass scale. I take a lot of pride in my gear, and it’s incredibly rewarding getting positive feedback.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Doing Good Works

Part of Tim’s mission with goodwerks is to become a contributing member of his local community and to, in essence, put good into the world. Where did the name “goodwerks” come from? We’ll let Tim explain: “goodwerks came about with the help of a friend. I initially was going to call it ‘threadwerks’ or something similar. But my friend Dan told me to take a look at the back of my right hand, which is tattooed with the word “good” and an ax through the letters. It’s a reminder to ‘sharpen my axe’ daily and to make the best of all situations.”

Good isn’t just part of his business’s name. It’s also fundamental to Tim’s personal philosophy and a guiding principle for the way he lives his life each and every day. “A large part of my business is to give back and to create good in the world. Each month, people that follow my Instagram account nominate others to receive some free gear from me. It’s a simple gesture to show others appreciation. I also am working on having regular raffles that benefit nonprofit organizations, mainly organizations that are veteran-oriented. In November 2020, with the help of my favorite local coffee shop donating some coffee, and a slap/patch maker, we raised $1,250 for One More Wave, a foundation that helps wounded veterans get surf therapy.”

tim with EDC bag

Tim recently held his second nonprofit raffle and raised $1,700. Proceeds went to The Enduring Campaign, a Michigan-based nonprofit that offers job placement and other support to the homeless veteran community. Good works and gratitude keep Tim humble through the growing success of his sewing business. “There’s no way I’d still be running with this little business without the community that’s helped support me. The people that have spent their hard-earned money with me have helped me stay afloat during the shutdowns. It’s incredibly humbling every time I get an email with an order. goodwerks doesn’t exist without the community surrounding it.”

Tim’s positive outlook on life and his desire to pay it forward is something we can all appreciate and strive toward. It’s a nice reminder that anyone can give back and put some goodness into the world, whether that’s through DIY or by other means. The world could use a few more people like Tim. Putting good into the world, even in a small way, has a ripple effect that grows and expands beyond our sight. Let’s all go do some good.

tim sewing

If you’d like to follow Tim’s EDC sewing adventures you can follow him on Instagram @goodwerks.

One Stitch at a Time

In recent years, the market for handcrafted projects has skyrocketed and so has the support for the crafter community. Because we’re a small business as well as a one-stop shop for all things sewing, we know this community well. Jo Yee Yap is a budding professional sewist brimming with creativity and a can-do spirit. Although she hasn’t been sewing for long, she’s already created a number of impressive projects and caught our attention. Together with her Sailrite® Fabricator® Sewing Machine, Jo is proof that anybody with an eye for ingenuity can become a maker. 

Jo and one of her custom creations.

Jo’s introduction into the world of custom leather crafting began with a simple project. She explained that she first had the urge to learn how to make a canvas tote bag and signed up for a local sewing class. After the class, she was inspired to see what else she could create. She then began attending regular sewing classes, watching sewing videos on YouTube, and reading books on beginner sewing techniques. “I am inspired by the countless designs of bag styles, and I believe that your own bag has the power to define and describe your personality. This led to a desire to create my own timeless designs out of durable goods and further develop my sewing skills.”

But how did this crafting curiosity lead her to Sailrite? Well, that, too, started with a simple sewing class. “At a sewing class I attended at the Klum House in Portland, Oregon, I had the opportunity to test out sewing leather on a Sailrite Fabricator versus a Juki industrial machine. The main reason why the Sailrite Fabricator stood out to me as the clear winner was because of the great slow speed control. After that class, I decided to research more about the Fabricator and made the investment. As I’m relatively new to sewing, I was nervous about setting up the machine. However, Sailrite had clear, easy and concise steps, and the variety of video tutorials on their YouTube page really served as an added bonus.”

The stitch-by-stitch power of the Fabricator makes it ideal for sewing bags.

“I have been able to create such unique projects with the Sailrite Fabricator! The stitch-by-stitch power is something that should not be underestimated. Sailrite also offers a unique leather foot to ensure that your leather is protected from any marks that could be caused during sewing. What I love most about Sailrite as a company is that they always prioritize customers first. The customer service is as great as it gets. I’ve always had my questions answered, and I’ve always received guidance on my troubleshooting issues on my machine almost immediately by members of the Sailrite team.”

“Currently I sew projects for myself, friends and family. Some of my most recent projects include a leather tote bag and a wallet. I hope to one day launch my own business and join the dynamic community of local makers in the greater Seattle area. I look forward to continuing my journey in leathercraft and defining my voice in the makerspace. I look forward to introducing new bag designs in the near future.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

But with all these projects on the horizon, we wanted to know what Jo enjoyed most about the makers’ lifestyle and what factors she considered to be the most difficult. “My favorite part of this unique lifestyle is the endless possibilities and designs you can create. Innovation is a fundamental concept for us as creators, and it is what gets me excited to continue to build upon my skills in the realm of leather crafting.”

It’s no secret that the DIY process is rife with trial and error until you achieve the perfect project, and it’s always beneficial for crafters to share their experiences with one another. When asked about what advice she would give to the budding DIYer, Jo had some thoughts to share with us. “Take risks and have the drive to always learn. For one successful bag design comes many trial prototypes and errors. Passion and perseverance are two key skills for emerging crafters. I also recommend cultivating a network of local crafters so you can learn from one another.” 

All you need is a little imagination and a great sewing machine!

If we learned one thing from Jo, it’s that the DIY spirit doesn’t have a time limit. If you have the desire to create, there’s no time like the present to embark on that dream project. It doesn’t matter if you dream of sewing your first stitch or you’ve been sewing for years, Sailrite is here to help you every step of the way. With our support behind you and the support of crafters in the DIY community, the only limit to your success is your imagination! 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.